Frequently asked questions

  • Q: Will a rattlesnake attack me, my family, or my pets?
  • A: To put it simply, no. “Attack” refers to an offensive action, and snakes only bite things larger than them if they’re defending themselves. This can mean stepping on, touching or grabbing, and cornering a snake.

 

  • Q: Do all rattlesnakes rattle?
  • A: Most of the time, a rattlesnake will hold off on rattling until they’ve been approached to close proximity or touched. Some populations are somewhat used to people or animals walking around, and may in fact remain quiet and still until they’ve been touched or stepped on.

 

  • Q: Why shouldn’t I just kill the thing?
  • A: What you do in the situation where you or someone at your home comes across a rattlesnake is entirely up to you. It isn’t illegal to kill a rattlesnake. However, if you hear me out or read into the lives of these creatures, I do hope it’ll change your mind. They don’t want to hurt you nor want to find themselves in a situation where they even have to defend themselves. If you aren’t a mouse or lizard, they won’t hurt you as long as you don’t try to hurt it.

 

  • Q: Why do you do what you do?
  • A: I enjoy working with rattlesnakes; they’re some of the most interesting and misunderstood animals on this planet. I don’t enjoy seeing them get killed and grew accustom to the idea of relocating them to more suitable environments, and founded PSR accomplish both things in addition to helping people understand what’s going on in the mind of a rattlesnake the best I can.

 

  • Q: Does snake repellent work?
  • A: I’ve found rattlesnakes in yards with inches of the stuff piled up around the property line as if a snow plow scraped it all up and pushed it against every inch of the fence line.

 

  • Q: Is a juvenile rattlesnake more venomous than an adult?
  • A: In short, no. Juvenile rattlesnake venom glands are a fraction of the size of an adults. Juveniles and adults can control the venom dispensed in a bite, too. While juvenile rattlesnakes may have slightly more toxic of venom, the added toxicity only makes up for the smaller amount of venom they have when they’re small. A bite from an adult can deliver far more venom, making the playing field in regards to venom even.

 

  • Q: How fast is your response time?
  • A: In nearly all cases where we offer emergency service, it’s an hour or less. We respond from Rocklin where we’re based out of (unless we’re on another service call elsewhere), so the closer you are to Rocklin, the faster we come running.

 

  • Q: Is there anything I can do while you respond out to remove a rattlesnake?
  • A: If you call me out to remove a rattlesnake, I’ll usually ask that you or someone tries to keep an eye on the little (or big) guy or girl. Generally, when you stay in visible distance of a rattlesnake, it’ll stay relatively still; it’s when you walk away after finding it they may take off while the coast is clear.

 

  • Q: Where do rattlesnakes like to hide?
  • A: Rattlesnakes are secretive creatures. They don’t care for being out in the open, and are generally seeking a cozy bush, rock, or woodpile to hangout in or setup in ambush near hoping for a mouse. However, if these places are harder to find, they may find shelter against the shady side of a home, in a garage, or under any items near our house that create some cover.